Ancient Technology That Proves An Advanced Civilization Was On Earth

Recently I engaged with some friends in a conversation regarding the human history vs religions, and I argued that if we enjoyed the same openness and/or creativity that other cultures enjoyed, namely the ancient Greece, we would most likely end up drawing the same characters they have whether you call them Gods, demons, and daemons; but based on their description in Quran or Hadeeth, or Torah & Gospel.

I’m most certainly not interested in the endless debate of why Muslims didn’t draw angels for example, but this conversation got me interested in learning more about our history as humans. For this, and after bit of googling, I ended up liking the work of Rita Louise author of The E.T. Chronicles: What Myths and Legends Tell Us About Human Origins but as such history is better visualized, I looked her up on YouTube and found the following interesting lecture on how ancient technology proves advanced ancient civilization.

Ancient Technology That Proves An Advanced Civilization Was On Earth

Organized into a chronology that starts with “in the beginning” and ends with the advent of civilization, it brings together myths from many cultures (including the Sumerians, the Greek, the Maya and the Aborigines of Australia) and explores them in the context of current scientific discoveries. The result is a mind-blowing re-visioning of human origins through a close reading of ancient texts.

Rather than simply visiting our planet at the dawn of Sumerian civilization as some researchers believe, the ET intervention occurred 3.8 billion years ago when they helped to terraform the planet. Physical descriptions of these entities as well as their alleged origins suggest that there were at least four different races of ETs visiting Earth and interacting with both humans and each other during ancient times.

Later I stumbled upon Erich von Däniken‘s lecture on Puzzling Ancient History Discoveries Show Impossible Truth For Mankind, which after watching it carefully, I ended up with the conclusion that I already had the question mark, but now I do have many questions marks to explore their possible answers.

Dear Internet Explorer:

It’s over. Our relationship just hasn’t been working for a while, and now, this is it. I’m leaving you for another browser.

I know this isn’t a good time–you’re down with yet another virus. I do hope you feel better soon–really, I do–but I, too, have to move on with my life. Fact is, in the entire time I’ve known you, you seem always to have a virus or an occasional worm. You should really see a doctor.

That said, I just can’t continue with this relationship any longer. I know you say you’ll fix things, that next time it’ll go better–but that’s what you said the last time–and the time before that. Each time I believed you.

Well, not any longer.

You cheater!
The truth is there’s nothing more you can say to make things better. I know about your secret marriage to Windows. You say you two are not seeing each other anymore, but I just don’t believe it. You say you can live without Windows, and I’ve heard that Windows can live without you, but I know that’s simply not true.

What about HTML e-mail in Outlook? Every time there’s a new letter in the Inbox, you rush over to help Windows render it. And what about HTML within Word? There you go again. And don’t get me started with those late nights you’ve spent rendering thumbnail images in Windows Explorer. You’re all over Windows and, what, you just expect me to turn a blind eye?

You’re no longer fit
For another thing, you’ve gone and gotten all lazy and out of shape on me. When was the last time you picked up a new feature? Two years ago? Three? While you rest on your laurels, while you spend your days slapping patches on the various flaws that seem to pour out as though your source code were a colander, the Internet has changed. A lot.

Last Christmas, I gave you a free RSS reader, Pluck, and you seemed to like it, with new feeds popping up from time to time keeping you fun and relevant. It gave me reason to think maybe you and I could work things out. But, in the end, it just wasn’t a true fit; it wasn’t really a part of you.

When I mentioned wanting to view more than one Web page at a time, you just laughed, said it couldn’t be done. Well, I knew that wasn’t true. Opera, Netscape, and now Firefox, they can all do it. You simply don’t want to discuss change.

And when you do, it’s only because of someone else. A certain someone else: Windows. Don’t deny it. You didn’t think twice when Windows XP SP2 offered you its shiny new pop-up blocker. Or gave you new firewall protection. I know Windows has promised to block buffer overflows, too–but I’ll believe it when I see it.

Yet what have you done for me lately? I don’t want to keep upgrading my operating system just to keep you around. Talk about baggage.

This is it
I know, I’ve tried breaking up before, and I’ve always come back, but that’s because I couldn’t find the right browser to move on with. I want an independent browser, one that stands on its own without a codependent operating system. What I want is a browser that’s strong and secure, one that handles the latest content and won’t crash. I want transparency. I want code that actually means something.

I have found just that.

With Mozilla Firefox, at least I know where I stand. The code is open source, built from the ground up, clean–not recycled. No more hidden agendas. At least when there’s a flaw in Firefox, this browser alerts me on its toolbar. It doesn’t try to hide its mistakes, waiting until the second Tuesday of the month to offer me a patch for some flaw that’s been out there for six months already.

I can take my Firefox to my Mac and Linux friends, and everyone gets along just fine. You barely even talk to Macs anymore, and you always seem to walk out of the room whenever Linux stops by. Why? What are you afraid of? Honestly, a grown browser like you afraid of a little operating system? I think this snobby behavior speaks volumes about what’s wrong with this relationship.

So this is it: Good-bye. I know you’ll do fine without me; you always have. I’m sure there’ll be someone who’ll find you to be cute and interesting. It just won’t be me.

if you can write a better break-up letter to IE Talkback